Love Music Ltd Overview

Whatever the genre, music is living testimony to the fact that cultures can and do mix. Music has the power to unite, to give strength and to effect positive social change. Racism, on the other hand, weakens us; it creates barriers and turns friends and neighbours against one another.

Some charities generate all, or a substantial part, of their income from investments which may have been donated to the charity as endowment or set aside by the charity from its own resources in the past. Such investments usually take the form of stocks and shares but may include other assets, such as property, that are capable of generating income and/or capital growth. Last month LMHR partnered with Barking and Dagenham Council to put on the Becontree 100 festival. The festival, which included performances from Frank Turner, Nova Twins, Joe Talbot and Yolanda Brown, promoted an antiracist message and celebrated the multicultural nature of the borough. It was precisely the opposite of what Nick Griffin and the BNP would have brought to the borough if antiracists and anti-fascists had not stopped them.

In the early 2000s, reggae and punk had long since been replaced by various other genres of music that were now reflecting the experiences and tastes of young people. Indie, grime, garage hip hop, RnB, bhangra, drum and bass were some of the many genres of music capturing young people’s attention. https://www.pancakemeow.com/ Hate Racism began life as the slogan of the Rock Against Racism movement of the mid-1970s to early 1980s. Still, it was a fitting name for a new antiracism campaign to emerge in the early 2000s to pick up the mantle of its predecessor. RAR activists sought to occupy music and popular culture as a space for antiracism and multicultural exchange instead of the National Front, who preached a bigoted mono-cultural nationalist politics that rejected difference.

Over £200 million has been raised from our crowd to support the projects they love! ‘Got to Be Tough’ follows on from 2010’s ‘Flip and Twist’ and features Sly Dunbar on drums, Zak Starkey on guitar and Cyril Neville on percussion. The album also includes a cover of the Bob Marley track ‘Three Little Birds’ featuring his son Ziggy Marley. The majority of LMHR budget comes through donations, which has been impacted during the pandemic.

In the tradition of the Rock Against Racism movement of the late 1970s, there have been now been many hundreds of LMHR events, from large outdoor festivals to local gigs and club nights. LMHR use the energy of our music scenes to celebrate diversity and involve people in anti-racist activity, in the tradition of the Rock Against Racism movement of the late 1970s. The LMHR campaign has a renewed importance with the increase in islamophobia, anti-migrant racism and hostility towards refugees in Britain and across Europe. It is time to reignite our national movement against racism through music.

It is a huge step forward for creators, the UK music industry and the millions who love the music we produce. Gresham provides outstanding educational https://www.wikipedia.org/ talks and videos for the public free of charge. Your support will help us to encourage people’s love of learning for many years to come.

There will also be a real community feel to the events as well with Liverpool arts organisations including Movema, Katumba, Pagoda Arts Orchestra and The Lighthouse Choir taking to the stage. It is said that a good song stands the test of time, and that can be said about the 40 musical numbers featured in a new show for 2021, I Love Music at the Babbacombe Theatre in Torquay. You can expect to enjoy a fun-filled production that will take you on an inspirational musical journey, encapsulating all genres on the musical spectrum spanning five decades. Accompanies BBC2’s major new TV series and The Story of Music in 50 Pieces on Radio 3.

Deep dive into big issues affecting musicians, from the latest on music and Covid-19 crisis to a spotlight on musicians developing their careers. Please, if you can, take a Lateral Flow test before coming to the Arts Centre, and if this is positive, don’t come. These tests aim to pick up anyone who is infectious at the moment of testing, so please take the test as late as possible on the same day before coming to the Arts Centre. If you test positive, a refund or transfer of your ticket to another event can be arranged, if you let us know before the start of the event, by emailing